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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/29/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Minoo

    How I can improve my English spoken skills ?

    Thank you for this question, Muhammad. I know many of you need to improve your speaking skills. To improve your speaking skills, you need to work on: - your pronunciation - your active use of structures - your active range of daily vocabulary and expressions In my experience, the most effective way of improving all three elements I mention above, in one single activity, is listening to and repeating common phrases and sentences out loud on a daily basis, sometimes called the 'imitation' technique. That is precisely why we have voice-recorded every sentence that is included in the Anglo-Pedia Exercises, i.e. roughly 3000 sentences for you to first complete (gap-fill exercises) or type out (Q/A exercises), and then hear and repeat. Remember the key is to repeat these sentences out loud and correctly several times, as if you were rehearsing your lines for a play. Some of us make the mistake of only listening and repeating a semi-correct version of the sentence under our breath once. That does not improve our speaking skills. Obviously, free practice i.e. speaking English with someone regularly is a great bonus, but only if the person you speak to is a teacher or a native speaker who corrects you and gives you feed-back on what you need to improve. If you do not have access to such a person, the next best practice is to listen to a native speaker with a clear accent on subjects that interest you on YouTube, or to watch movies with easy everyday dialogues. I hope many of you follow these recommendations, and see how rapidly your speaking skills improve.
  2. 2 points
    LilianC

    Happy New Year

    I would like to wish you a very Happy and Healthy New Year, and thank you for your continued great support! Regards.
  3. 2 points
    Butterfly 55

    Happy New Year

    Best wishes and a happy new year. Last year I have rushed a bit through the Anglo-link course, so, I suppose that I will have to come back and assimilate of what I have learned. My intention is: should do it a more intelligent way this time…take note in an diary of what has been done, and see if I am able to reproduce it by heart. Should I see an opportunity, I will bring up or make publicity for Anglo-link when spoken of learning English language. Also, I would like to mention that well written course book; Oxford Practice Grammar by John Eastwood. Regards.
  4. 2 points
    Наталья Мирончик

    Daily challenge

    Thank you, Phil! Your answer is really helpful. I absolutely agree with you, I've thought the same way. So, most probably, there is a mistake in the challenge that needs a correction.
  5. 2 points
    Minoo

    Welcome to your brand new site!

    Thank you very much for your positive feedback. We're delighted that you like the site, and hope you will enjoy using it.
  6. 1 point
    Butterfly 55

    Google translation: Dutch versus British

    Thanks. I have found the first two sentences without any help. The third one came from a dictionary. Bye
  7. 1 point
    Minoo

    grammar

    Hello Nicola, 1. We use 'young' for people who we consider are 'middle-aged' or 'old' now, and 'younger' for people we consider 'still young'. It's a subjective choice. 2. I agree with you that 'the' is not necessary before 'mobile phones'. Maybe there's a typing error in the exercise.
  8. 1 point
    Bernard M

    Better go

    I am very happy that this was an opportunity for you to learn something after all you have taught me.
  9. 1 point
    Minoo

    daily challenge

    Thank you for reporting this, Luca! We've managed to sort out most of the bugs you had reported. Let me know if you feel the experience is overall smoother now. The one that the software is still struggling with is question tags, especially with Present and Past Perfect tenses. We're working on it. Best wishes, Minoo
  10. 1 point
    Minoo

    conditionals

    Hello Luca, The correct answers are: If she didn't have ... When 'have' is the main verb, use an auxiliary with it. ......, he would have taken .... The structure is correct, but it is not negative.
  11. 1 point
    Minoo

    subject-verb agreement

    Hello Luca, No, as a phrasal verb, the meaning is complete with out 'yourself': refresh yourself = freshen up
  12. 1 point
    Minoo

    subject-verb agreement

    Hello Luca, Yes, both answers should be considered correct. I'll ask the administrator to adjust the test.
  13. 1 point
    Butterfly 55

    Lesson 7 Making a company presentation - Gap-fill Excercise

    Okay, as it is stated in the course. In 2015, we decided to go global, and have now set up subsidiaries in various parts of the world, with Asia Pacific being the most recent addition. Thanks a lot.
  14. 1 point
    Minoo

    passive sentences

    Hello Luca, 1. Your answer is also correct, but, if you check the instruction in the test again, it says: If there are two objects, use the person(s) in object position. This is because I want you to practise putting the person in object position, which is common in English. 2. Yes, the mistake is in the participle: wake - woke - woken.
  15. 1 point
    Minoo

    key word transformation

    1. 'long' can refer to length or time: How long is the stick? 50 centimetres. How long is the movie: 2 hours. Therefore, in the context, you don't need to mention the word 'time'. 2. With the verb 'believe' you cannot drop 'to be'. If the verb were 'considered', you could: They're considered (to be) weak ...
  16. 1 point
    Minoo

    noun

    Hello Luca, When a proper noun exists (sale), we tend to use that instead of the gerund form (selling).
  17. 1 point
    Minoo

    Pronouncing 'mopped'

    Hello Oleh, The word is 'mobbed'. /b/ + /d/
  18. 1 point
    Minoo

    be listening to or listen to?

    Hello Luca, You're being asked to listen TO people's pronunciation FOR some information (the specific way they're pronouncing something). 'to be listening' is the Continuous Infinitive form, and is used instead of the Present Infinitive to stress the continuity of the action. You may want to review the different infinitive forms in this exclusive video.
  19. 1 point
    Butterfly 55

    Another bug?

    Okay, I had police constable, Bobby Robert of Scotland Yard in mint. Thanks.
  20. 1 point
    Minoo

    Another bug?

    Hello Butterfly55, Your formulation is correct. The problem is your word order: Robert used to be called Bobby.
  21. 1 point
    Butterfly 55

    Little surprised with the use of ‘to have’

    1. seem to do / be / have something used to make what you say about your thoughts, feelings or actions less strong I seem to have left my book at home. I canʼt seem to (= Iʼve tried, but I canʼt) get started today. 2.ˈtake to somebody/ something [no passive] to start liking somebody/ something I took to my new boss immediately. He hasnʼt taken to his new school.
  22. 1 point
    eddy andrianasolo

    Essay writing tips tutorial

    Hello, Thank you for the tips I will try to do that. Eddy
  23. 1 point
    Butterfly 55

    Have some questions about Conditional 'if' test.

    Thanks a lot. I’ve studied those structures for a few days, it should come with ease. Kind regards
  24. 1 point
    Minoo

    Have some questions about Conditional 'if' test.

    Hello Butterfly, 1. The second conditional is about zero and low probability Present & Future situations. That's why it's perfectly o.k. to use it with words like 'now' and 'tomorrow': If we left the house now (improbable because you are not ready ready), we WOULD get there by noon. 2. Yes, that sentence is correct too. There are many possibilities: will / would / could you ask him ..... & also the imperative: ask him ... 3. That's the idea!
  25. 1 point
    PHIL73

    Happy New Year

    Hello everyone, My best wishes for the new year to all of you! And great success at learning English! Phil
  26. 1 point
    LilianC

    would for present And future guesse or presumption??

    Hello Mino. Thanks for your explanation.
  27. 1 point
    Minoo

    Happy New Year

    Thank you, Phil, for your great support throughout 2019! It has been much appreciated. We also wish you all the very best for 2020!
  28. 1 point
    Minoo

    Daily challenge

    A very good question and a very good answer! As Phil has suggested, grammatically, 'steak' can be used both as a countable and an uncountable noun: I'm going to have (a) steak today. With 'a', you're referring to a piece of meat on your plate. Without 'a', you're referring to the idea of 'steak' in general.
  29. 1 point
    PHIL73

    Daily challenge

    Hello Наталья Мирончик, (sorry, this is a link, but I wasn't able to type your name with my keyboard ) In my opinion, when you say "I'll have steak" to the waiter/waitress in a restaurant, this means that you haven't decided yet what kind of steak you would like. I think you could also say: "I'll have a steak". Then the waiter/waitress is likely to ask you which one you want. Now, your answer would be: "I'll have this one" or "I'll have the rib-eye steak" for instance. I hope this helps, Phil
  30. 1 point
    PHIL73

    Error in the Daily Challenge

    Hello, I think there is an error in the Intermediate Daily Challenge. Every time I read out loud the sentence "We charge a three percent commission", it says: Not quite. Mistake: We charge a 3% commission. Correction: We charge a three percent commission. I'm sure it is a very smart device, I do mean it, but how could it know that I speak in digital characters?
  31. 1 point
    Minoo

    Error in the Daily Challenge

    Hello Phil, That is highly amusing! It seems that your machine is a lot cleverer than mine! I have tested these sentences several times myself, and I don't remember this happening to me. Thanks a lot for reporting this. I have reported it to Tom to fix.
  32. 1 point
    Suresh Madusha

    A question

    Thank you Minoo.
  33. 1 point
    Rodolfo Marttos

    TONGUE TWISTER - William Tell

    Thelma will tell William Tell details about tales of whales.
  34. 1 point
    Minoo

    Daily Challenge

    Hello Elisabet, I'm really glad that you're enjoying the daily challenges. Keep up the good work, and speak to you in our next session soon.
  35. 1 point
    Minoo

    Tongue Twister - BROOKE SHIELDS

    Thank you, Rodolfo! Just a small grammatical correction: Brooke Shield's child BROKE his shield yesterday.
  36. 1 point
    Tom

    When can we use ‘being’

    Hi Folks A new exclusive video is available. Check it out now: When can we use ‘being’. Although 'be' is a state verb and can never take a Continuous tense, we often see and hear the word 'being'. In this lesson, we're going to look at the uses of 'being': When 'be' means 'behave' In Passive Structures As a Gerund
  37. 1 point
    Minoo

    Everybody smile!

    Hello Bernard and Hari, You're both right. When 'everybody' is the subject of a sentence, it definitely takes a singular verb: Everybody smiles when they pose for a photo. (Hari, please note that the 'singular' verb form is with 's': smiles). However, in Bernard's sentence, 'smile' is in the imperative form, which is the same as the base verb. Someone is asking everybody to smile for the photo: Everybody, SMILE (for the photo), please!
  38. 1 point
    Minoo

    Listening stories

    Yes, Hari is right. Listening to stories is very useful in improving your listening and speaking skills. Depending on how you like to study, you can: a) Just listen to stories that you like for fun. You can do this anywhere anytime. This mainly improves your listening skills and your pronunciation. It also keeps the vocabulary you can already use active. b) Use the stories for transcription exercises. This of course means you need to a) also have the written version of the same story, and b) sit at your computer and work with a small section of the story each time. This exercise has a higher impact on your listening comprehension skills and your pronunciation, and it also improves your use of grammar and expands your vocabulary range. In my opinion, if you can, you should do both: Sometimes just listen to stories for fun, and sometimes use them for transcription exercises.
  39. 1 point
    Chary

    Listening stories

    I think, listening to stories reinforce our usage of words or phrases. Firstly, by searching for unknown words it would increase our vocabulary. Secondly, by observing the phrases we can understand the grammar part provided we have basic Grammer skills. Finally, listening and speaking skills can be improved with no second thought. On the whole, we can definitely increase our communication skills through stories as long as we continually improve ourselves.
  40. 1 point
    Minoo

    Welcome to your brand new site!

    Thank you very much for your very positive feedback, Ivan. It's great to know that we have provided you with a self-study platform that you could not find anywhere else. It really motivates us to continue developing it.
  41. 1 point
    Minoo

    How to use this forum & Example

    Welcome to the ‘General Questions’ Forum. Here, you can post any language question. However, if your question is related to the content of the modules you are studying on the Anglo-Pedia Platform, please post it in the dedicated Forum below. An example of a General question: Which spelling is correct: 1990s or 1990’s?
  42. 0 points
    Minoo

    Passive Voice

    Hello Yemel and Phil, This is a tricky one. The answer is: Robert used to be called Bobby. = Robert's nickname used to be Bobby (by everyone). Thanks for answering Phil.
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