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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/28/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    LilianC

    Happy New Year

    I would like to wish you a very Happy and Healthy New Year, and thank you for your continued great support! Regards.
  2. 2 points
    Наталья Мирончик

    Daily challenge

    Thank you, Phil! Your answer is really helpful. I absolutely agree with you, I've thought the same way. So, most probably, there is a mistake in the challenge that needs a correction.
  3. 2 points
    Bernard M

    Let your hair down.

    Hello, perhaps ... He needs to pull his socks up
  4. 2 points
    Minoo

    Adjectives and adverbs

    Hello Hari, Assuming your question is about expanding our repertoire of such words (and not how to use them grammatically correctly), I would recommend reading novels as a way of enlarging your repertoire. It is the descriptive texts in novels that will be full of adjectives and adverbs. However, I would suggest that you choose simplified graded novels where you will find common and frequently used adjectives and adverbs that you can use in your own speaking and writing. There are two good series you can choose novels from: - Macmillan Readers - Oxford Bookworms And remember, as I recommend for any type of vocabulary building exercise: 1. Write down a phrase or a sentence that contains the word you're learning, not (just) the translation. 2. Check and learn the pronunciation of the new word in an online dictionary or use the audio version of the same book to hear all of it including the new words.
  5. 2 points
    Bernard M

    Question words - how long

    Thanks a lot to both of you.
  6. 2 points
    Minoo

    Grammar challenge 3

    Thank you everyone for participating in this challenge, which was slightly trickier than the previous two. The first point, as Butterfly55 has explained, is that 'anyone' is used with a singular verb. The trickier point is that if you need a pronoun or a possessive adjective to accompany 'anyone', 'everyone', etc., you should either use his/her & him/her, which is heavy, or use the 'genderless they'. So, the correct answer is: Has anyone brought their laptop with them? Well done if you got it right, but don't worry if you didn't. The purpose of the challenge is to make you aware of these tricky points.
  7. 1 point
    eddy andrianasolo

    Essay writing tips tutorial

    Hello, Thank you for the tips I will try to do that. Eddy
  8. 1 point
    Butterfly 55

    Have some questions about Conditional 'if' test.

    Thanks a lot. I’ve studied those structures for a few days, it should come with ease. Kind regards
  9. 1 point
    Minoo

    Have some questions about Conditional 'if' test.

    Hello Butterfly, 1. The second conditional is about zero and low probability Present & Future situations. That's why it's perfectly o.k. to use it with words like 'now' and 'tomorrow': If we left the house now (improbable because you are not ready ready), we WOULD get there by noon. 2. Yes, that sentence is correct too. There are many possibilities: will / would / could you ask him ..... & also the imperative: ask him ... 3. That's the idea!
  10. 1 point
    Minoo

    Happy New Year

    Thank you, Phil, for your great support throughout 2019! It has been much appreciated. We also wish you all the very best for 2020!
  11. 1 point
    Minoo

    Daily challenge

    A very good question and a very good answer! As Phil has suggested, grammatically, 'steak' can be used both as a countable and an uncountable noun: I'm going to have (a) steak today. With 'a', you're referring to a piece of meat on your plate. Without 'a', you're referring to the idea of 'steak' in general.
  12. 1 point
    PHIL73

    Error in the Daily Challenge

    Hello, I think there is an error in the Intermediate Daily Challenge. Every time I read out loud the sentence "We charge a three percent commission", it says: Not quite. Mistake: We charge a 3% commission. Correction: We charge a three percent commission. I'm sure it is a very smart device, I do mean it, but how could it know that I speak in digital characters?
  13. 1 point
    Rodolfo Marttos

    TONGUE TWISTER - William Tell

    Thelma will tell William Tell details about tales of whales.
  14. 1 point
    Rodolfo Marttos

    Tongue Twister - Chip and Dale

    I saw some sheep watching Chip and Dale on TV yesterday. They were eating cheap chips while Cheap and Dale shipped chips by ship.
  15. 1 point
    Rodolfo Marttos

    VIDEO DICTIONARY - THE FARM PART2

    Hi friends! This is my Video Dictionary – The Farm Part2. I’ll try to publish one vídeo every week. I hope that you appreciate! Thank you! THE_FARM2_v2.mp4
  16. 1 point
    LilianC

    VIDEO DICTIONARY - THE FARM PART2

    Really good for learning vocabulary specially with children. Blessings.
  17. 1 point
    LilianC

    Grammar

    Minoo explains grammar in a very clear and understandable way and support her explanation with examples. I'm improving the language. Thanks.
  18. 1 point
    Minoo

    VIDEO DICTIONARY - THE FARM PART2

    Very nice! Thank you, Rodolfo!
  19. 1 point
    Rodolfo Marttos

    Tongue Twister - Buzz Lightyear

    I saw Buzz Lightyear one year ago on a bus station waiting for a space ship, and he was eating a potato chips.
  20. 1 point
    Minoo

    Tongue Twister - SEAN PENN

    Thank you for sharing these tongue twisters, Rodolfo. They're great pronunciation exercises.
  21. 1 point
    Minoo

    Tongue Twister - Glenn Close

    Nice one, Rodolfo! Thank you for sharing!
  22. 1 point
    Minoo

    Would (Future)

    Yes, Sandeep, the 'would' here is an implied Conditional 2: If there were a war, it would be a disaster. It indicates that the author feels that the war is 'improbable'. If the author had used 'will', the sentence would be an implied Conditional 1 sentence, and would indicate that the author feels that the war is 'probable'. Therefore, you are right in assuming that the choice of 'would' instead of 'will' expresses the author's opinion as to how probable or improbable an event is.
  23. 1 point
    Minoo

    Would (Future)

    Hello Sandeep and Phil, As Phil has said, 'would' gives the sentence a hypothetical sense (Second Conditional). 'will' is a prediction of something probably happening in the future: Conditional 2 (improbable/hypothetical): We are not going to introduce such a policy because (if we did,) it would not be constitutional. Conditional 1(probable): It is risky to introduce such a policy because (if we do,), it will not be constitutional. In the other example, the same logic can apply if we are actually discussing what's currently going on in a tribal setting. However, there's another possibility, and that is describing how things used to work in the past (using 'would' as an alternative to 'used to'): In that culture, whenever a chief died, his son would inherit all his dominions.
  24. 1 point
    Minoo

    Ebook with audio file from Macmillian Readers Website

    You're welcome. Never worry about mistakes. That's what the exercises and tests are for: to show you where there are gaps so you can review the relevant part of the lessons and fill those gaps. Happy continuation!
  25. 1 point
    Minoo

    Present perfect vs present perfect continuous.

    Hello Viral, Yes, you have understood correctly: Present Perfect Continuous is the correct choice for action verbs with for and since. However, Past Perfect Continuous, despite being the correct tense with 'for', is often replaced by Past Perfect. Therefore, your two sentences above have the same meaning.
  26. 1 point
    Minoo

    Present perfect vs present perfect continuous.

    Hello Viral, Thank you for your question. These tenses are difficult to get right every time because of the differences between British and American English. Let me answer according to strict British English rules. These will help you in your own usage, but do not be surprised if you hear 'ungrammatical' usage in movies and informal conversations. Your four answers to the question 'What have you done today?' are all possible, but let me add some notes: 1) I have played tennis. ( ... and I've done X, and I've done Y) - This is the best answer: telling them the different things you have done. 2) I have played tennis for 2 hours. - Correct grammatically, but again, you should mention the other things you've done. If you only want to talk about playing tennis, then it's best to put it in a past time frame: I went to the club at 9 o'clock and played tennis with Jim for two hours. 3) I had played tennis for 2 hours before friend A visited me. - See 4) using the Past Perfect instead of Perfect Continuous is acceptable here. 4) I had been playing tennis for 2 hours before friend A visited me. - As with 2), if you want to be detailed, introduce a time frame: Friend A visited me at 11. I had been playing ...... To answer your other question: While it is o.k. to replace Past Perfect Continuous with Past Perfect (because native speakers tend to do it in daily usage), it is not o.k. to replace Present Perfect Continuous with 'for' and 'since' with Present Perfect when talking about short-term actions. So, avoid saying 'It has rained for two hours / since 9 a.m. Say: 'It has been raining for two hours / since 9 a.m. I hope this answers your question.
  27. 1 point
    Chary

    Disappointed

    It's clear Minoo. Thanks a lot.
  28. 1 point
    Santa9rose

    Health Issues

    Dear Minoo, I see. The right answer was ‘look forward ‘ because it was formal message. I’m clear now and try it again. thank you very much. kyoko
  29. 1 point
    Chary

    which tense is appropriate?

    In my opinion: 1. Somebody was being in my home when I was at office (past continuous instead of past perfect because two action are simultaneously occurring, additional I used passive voice as the person is not known, somebody). 2. It looks like somebody is in my home ( present simple instead of present perfect, based on your scenario 1, as there is no time frame to show continuity). 3. Firstly, we mustn't use 'being' after 'be' since it sounds awkward. Therefore, somebody was in my home, would be more appropriate. In all the three circumstances I used 'past simple' instead of 'present simple' as past simple is more appropriate for your scenario 1. I have posted the above as far as my knowledge. Please correct me if I'm wrong. Regards, Hari Kiran
  30. 1 point
    Minoo

    Conditional

    Hello Rasha, Thank you very much for your support. I'm glad you like my website. You raise a very interesting point, and you're right that occasionally we may see 'will' in the 'if' clause. That's usually when we're using 'will' to show someone's willingness to do / not to something: A: I will not speak to him. B: O.k. If you won't (are not willing to) speak to him, I will do it. In your sentence, too, you can replace 'won't by 'be willing to': If you are not willing to have something done on time, be clear about it.
  31. 1 point
    rasha j

    Conditional

    Hello dear Mino, firstly I would like to tell that I liked your website so much, wish you all the best, if you let me, I would like to add a comment about conditionals but I do not know if it fits here, while I was studying conditionals I came across this expression, if you won't have something done on time, be clear about it this is a conditional sentence used to give advice, and WILL has been used in the if clause. I do not have any question I just liked to add this to the students who are learning on your website thanks a lot for giving me that opportunity.
  32. 1 point
    Bernard M

    Everybody smile!

    Hello Minoo, Thank you for your explanation. I understood now!
  33. 1 point
    yomnaayman330

    Idiom about time

    Meaning of "Around the clock" or " Round the clock" Used as an adjective: Happening, lasting or continuing constantly for a significant period of time (at least a few days), or 24/7. Example: She needed round-the-clock care when she was in hospital. Used as an adverb: Working hard, often for very long hours. Example: Doctors worked around the clock to resuscitate her.
  34. 1 point
    Minoo

    suggestion

    Certainly! You can do that in the 'Vocabulary Building' section of the 'General English' forum. I explain how to do this here.
  35. 1 point
    Ventsislava

    mistake

    Thank you a lot Minoo and Butterly55 for your answers! Minoo, I saw where my mistake is. I didn't realise that "is invited" is Present Simple in the Passive Voice and this actually led to my confusion. Butterfly55, I really appreciated your answer too because it helped me to refresh that part of the grammar ;)) And also, I'm from Bulgaria Have a nice day,
  36. 1 point
    Vivsha

    does anyone can help me with this exercise?

    I also had the same problem. now it's fixed. Thanks Minoo.
  37. 1 point
    Butterfly 55

    All tenses - my mistakes rectified

    PS: People who I have met, or when questioning about their knowledges of English Language, will assume that they have fairly good working practice of speaking which seems enough for them. They have learned it through television programmes and entertainment, but nothing could be much further from the truth, only a few of them have a reasonable grasp of it. That is why I am on Anglo Link. Regards. O.K. the true = the truth
  38. 1 point
    Bernard M

    Conditional

    Hello Minoo, Sorry, I tried again, making sure there was no space, neither before nor after, and the result is the same. It seems to me that there is a little bug ... I wish you the best.
  39. 1 point
    Minoo

    Conditional

    Hello Bernard, This sentence requires a mixed conditional: He is afraid of spiders, so he didn't visit Australia when he WAS in New Zealand: If he wasn't / weren't (Conditional 2) terrified of spiders, he would have visited (Conditional 3) Australia (during his trip to New Zealand last year).
  40. 1 point
    Minoo

    Video lesson ‘Must and have to’

    Hello, I have just entered the exact answers you have entered above, and they were all correct! I have no idea why they come up as incorrect for you. Please try one more time, making sure that you are not typing any extra spaces, and let me know if this happens again. In any case, all your answers are correct.
  41. 1 point
    Bernard M

    Modal verb 'could'

    Thanks, Minoo. I get it now.
  42. 1 point
    Chary

    Improvement

    Thanks minoo for your motivation and support.
  43. 1 point
    Minoo

    does anyone can help me with this exercise?

    Hello Claudia, You need a preposition: either 'from' or 'with'.
  44. 1 point
    serg59

    Grammar challenge 2

    I unfortunately missed this challenge but the right answer is as Minoo said; she just reads my thoughts.
  45. 1 point
    MariaTeresa

    Exam

    Hello, have you ever studied with flash cards?? They are very useful for reviewing for exams! The best free software is ANKI because it supports images, audio and video. You could create some flash cards where you have to type the answers. There are a lot of video tutorials in English: I've attached one, just to give you an idea. You should check it out. Trust me. Not only for languages.
  46. 1 point
    Minoo

    Noums

    Hello Robledo, When choosing between 'a' and 'an', think about the sound, not the letter. Compare the pronunciation of 'university' with 'umbrella'. They're not the same, right? The 'u' in 'university' sounds like a 'y' (phonetic alphabet: /j/). This is not a vowel sound, so: a yo-yo, a young man, a yellow bag , a university. The 'u' in 'umbrella' is a vowel sound, so: an umbrella.
  47. 1 point
    Péguy

    feedback

    SIncerely i love this website.
  48. 1 point
    PHIL73

    How to build vocabulary ?

    Hello, I think there are two main categories of vocabulary words: the concrete and physical objects that you can see, and "abstract words" such as verbs, adjectives, adverbs, ... I find the first category the easiest to memorize, You just have to search a picture on the internet to illustrate the word, And we can even make flashcards with them. We can organise them by topic groups. The second category is more difficult to keep in mind. As far as I'm concerned, one of the best way to master new words is making up my own sentences with those words and try to use them. It's good to write down the sentences, and say them out loud as Minoo said. This technique is also useful to study any grammar point (especially the English tenses). And I'm going to try your suggestion Minoo for getting rid of English subtitles when I watch a film in original version...
  49. 1 point
    Minoo

    Example Question: 'How do you do?' & 'How are you?'

    No, ‘How do you do?’ is a formal synonym for ‘Nice to meet you.’ You can only use it when you meet someone for the first time. The reply to if is usually the same: ‘How do you do?’ ‘How are you?’ is a real question for someone you already know. They can reply: ‘I’m fine, thank you.’ or ‘Not very well.’
  50. 1 point
    Minoo

    Example Question: 'How do you do?' & 'How are you?'

    (Module 1 – Meeting, Greeting, Welcoming) Are ‘How do you do?’ and ‘How are you?’ synonyms?
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