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Gugus

continuous form

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Gugus

Hello Minoo,  i have confused about continuous form.  Sometimes i found the usage of  continuous form not in verb+ing form,  such as "A brawl was sparked... " or "he has been impressed by ... ".  Could you  explain me how exactly  is it? Thanks a lot

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PHIL73

Hello Gugus,

Both of the sentences are in the passive voice, not in the continuous form. The first one is in the past simple and the second one in the present perfect.

As far as I know, continuous form is always in be + verb + ING ending

So, in the continuous, the first sentence would be: "A brawl was sparking" (Past Continuous) which wouldn't make sens since the brawl cannot be the subject of the verb.

And the second one would be: "He has been impressing..." (Present Perfect Continuous) which would have a different meaning, "He" becoming the subject performing the verb "impress". 

I hope it helps

 

 

 

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Gugus

Thank you Phill.  I want to learn more about passive voice,  do you have a reference for me or Minoo,  could you help me? 

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Gugus

Hi Minoo,  thank you very much. I have just watched your Passive Voice video lesson.  I found it in youtube. I think,  it's very helpful but i need to watch that video more to get better understanding about Passive Voice. 

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Minoo

Hello Gugus,

Great! Yes, you do need to watch it a few times and take notes. In between, do the exercises to find out which points are still challenging. 

To get the maximum amount of practice and feedback, you may want to use 5 of your credits to unlock the additional exercises and tests on this page of Anglo-Pedia: 

 

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Gugus

Hi Minoo,  thanks for the module that you have shared.  It has been made more easy and fun for me to learn about Passive Voice. I'm more exited to learn English tenses now with you and anglo-link. 

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