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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/31/2017 in Posts

  1. 6 points
    Minoo

    How I can improve my English spoken skills ?

    Thank you for this question, Muhammad. I know many of you need to improve your speaking skills. To improve your speaking skills, you need to work on: - your pronunciation - your active use of structures - your active range of daily vocabulary and expressions In my experience, the most effective way of improving all three elements I mention above, in one single activity, is listening to and repeating common phrases and sentences out loud on a daily basis, sometimes called the 'imitation' technique. That is precisely why we have voice-recorded every sentence that is included in the Anglo-Pedia Exercises, i.e. roughly 3000 sentences for you to first complete (gap-fill exercises) or type out (Q/A exercises), and then hear and repeat. Remember the key is to repeat these sentences out loud and correctly several times, as if you were rehearsing your lines for a play. Some of us make the mistake of only listening and repeating a semi-correct version of the sentence under our breath once. That does not improve our speaking skills. Obviously, free practice i.e. speaking English with someone regularly is a great bonus, but only if the person you speak to is a teacher or a native speaker who corrects you and gives you feed-back on what you need to improve. If you do not have access to such a person, the next best practice is to listen to a native speaker with a clear accent on subjects that interest you on YouTube, or to watch movies with easy everyday dialogues. I hope many of you follow these recommendations, and see how rapidly your speaking skills improve.
  2. 5 points
    Boukhadra Mohamed Amine

    A joke .

    I read somewhere this joke ,and i want to share it with you. How to ask your Boss for a salary increase? One day an employee sends a letter to his boss asking for an increase in his salary. Dear Bo$$; In this ,we all need $omething desperately .I thing you should be under$tanding the need$ of u$.we are worker$ who have given $o much $upport including $weat and $ervice to our company. I’am $ure you will gue$$ what i meant and re$pond $oon. Your$ $incerely. The next day ,the employee received this letter reply; I kNOw you have been working very hard.NOwadays ,NOthing much has changed.you must have NOticed that our company is NOt doing NOticably well . NOw the newspaper are saying the world’s leading ecONmists are NOt sure if the US may go into aNOther recession . After the NOvember presidential elections things may turn bad. NOthing more to add NOw. You kNOw what i mean, Your boss.
  3. 4 points
    Chary

    Happy New Year

    Well said Minoo. I wish you all a very happy new year.
  4. 4 points
    Minoo

    Happy New Year

    A very Happy New Year to you too, Sergey! I couldn't agree more: The greatest joy comes from learning and discovering new things. If we were perfect, life would become extremely dull. Thank you for your great contribution to the forums in 2018. I hope you will keep it up in 2019.
  5. 4 points
    Minoo

    How to build vocabulary ?

    Thank you for your contribution, Pier. Indeed, it is great to use movies and songs that you like to learn new expressions. I would like to add a couple of suggestions: Choose movies you have already seen in your mother tongue and really liked, and watch them three or four times, first with English subtitles, and then two or three more times without subtitles with one or two weeks between each viewing. You will be amazed at how much more you understand each time even without subtitles. Remember that if you have the subtitles on all the time, your listening comprehension does not improve as much, so limit the subtitles only to the first time you watch a movie. Same goes for your favourite songs. Learn the lyrics (with some translation if necessary), and then listen to them again and again, and sing along with them.
  6. 4 points
    Minoo

    Example Question: Difference between 'plan' & 'arrangement'

    A ‘personal plan’ is something YOU have decided to do; it’s YOUR intention to do it; no-one else is involved. Use the 'going to' future: I'm going to do it tomorrow. An ‘arrangement’ involves other people, e.g. an appointment, or an external event, e.g. a flight. Use 'Present Continuous + future time marker': I'm doing it tomorrow.
  7. 3 points
    Hyravas

    Welcome to your brand new site!

    As feedback, I just wanted to compliment you on your new website, very clear, efficient and aesthetic!
  8. 3 points
    Minoo

    It's not my cup of tea.

    Phil has given us the right answer: The common expressions in English are right up my street / right up my alley. However, as I am impressed, Hari and Sergey, with your creativity, and as you are always active on the forums, you'll get some free credits too!
  9. 3 points
    serg59

    Happy New Year

    Happy New Year to every Anglo-Linker! Let all our troubles be gone in 2019, forgive yourself for not being perfect in English, keep learning and be happy!
  10. 3 points
    PHIL73

    Happy New Year

    Hello there, I would like to give everyone all my best wishes for the new year! Many beautiful things in the year to come ... (and a lot of improvement in English language of course )
  11. 3 points
    Minoo

    Grammar challenge

    Thank you all for participating in the challenge. The correct answer is the first one: Neither of them knows the other one's name. The points to remember here are: 'Neither of them' can be followed by either a singular verb (knows) or a plural verb (know). the other one's name (singular) - the others' names (plural) - Here, we're looking for the singular construction.
  12. 3 points
    MariaTeresa

    Suggestions to improve

    Hello Chary, since I failed that test too, I'm going to create my own ebook with Sigil: it's a free editing software and there are a lot of tutorials on YouTube in English. I'll include grammar and Minoo's exclusive videos in my chapters. For personal use, obviously. It's a different way to study, perfecting your grammar - this is the key to pass the test- and it will help you to remember most of the exceptions she included in the study section. I strongly reccommend you to try it out before buying something else, please believe me, make your own ebook , importing whatever you like, images too. If you don't know HTML code, there's a WYSIWYG interface. I wish you every success in your work
  13. 3 points
    PHIL73

    Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.

    Hello Minoo and Serg, After careful consideration, my answer is: "Beggars can't be choosers." Seriously, I'd be really surprised if that's not the right answer...
  14. 3 points
    serg59

    Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.

    Hello Minoo and Phil, I saw your quest and decided to participate if you don't mind. My answer is: Beggars can't be choosers.
  15. 3 points
    abhilive

    Phrasal verb in daily business communication

    Follow up: To continue communicating with someone after an event. Ex: Don't forget to follow up after the interview! To wrap up: To finish an event or an activity. Ex: Let's wrap up this meeting so we can go to lunch. To come up with: To think of an idea. Ex: We need to come up with a new strategy by next week. To burn out: To become a very overwhelmed with a heavy workload. Ex: If you work 80 hours per week, you will burn out. Carry out: To execute a project or assignment. Ex: Who will carry out your duties when you leave the company? To write up: To summarize information information in a formal report or study. Ex: Would you please write up a report about our newest product? Good Luck !!
  16. 3 points
    Minoo

    In a nutshell

    This is a popular expression which means you're going to say what you have to say in the shortest possible way, leaving all the details out. You can also say 'to make a long story short': In a nutshell, it all worked out beuatifully. To make a long story short, the meeting disintegrated into chaos.
  17. 3 points
    PHIL73

    The early bird catches the worm.

    Hello, This time, I'm not the early bird I found this Zulu proverb, which have the same meaning: "The horse that arrives early gets good drinking water." Or this simple one, which we also know in French: "First come, first served." Another one: "Hesitation and procrastination may lead to trouble or disaster." And finally, two funny quotes related to the very first above: "The early bird may gets the worm, but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese." "I think we consider too much the good luck of the early bird and not enough the bad luck of the early worm." - F. D. Roosevelt.
  18. 3 points
    Minoo

    Every cloud has a silver lining.

    This is a common saying that means: 'Every difficult situation has some benefit in it.' Next time you speak to someone who is experiencing some difficulty in their life, you may want to use this uplifting expression.
  19. 3 points
    PHIL73

    How to build vocabulary ?

    Hello, I think there are two main categories of vocabulary words: the concrete and physical objects that you can see, and "abstract words" such as verbs, adjectives, adverbs, ... I find the first category the easiest to memorize, You just have to search a picture on the internet to illustrate the word, And we can even make flashcards with them. We can organise them by topic groups. The second category is more difficult to keep in mind. As far as I'm concerned, one of the best way to master new words is making up my own sentences with those words and try to use them. It's good to write down the sentences, and say them out loud as Minoo said. This technique is also useful to study any grammar point (especially the English tenses). And I'm going to try your suggestion Minoo for getting rid of English subtitles when I watch a film in original version...
  20. 3 points
    Minoo

    pronunciation

    Indeed, improving your pronunciation is really important for two reasons: 1. Everyone can understand you more easily. 2. Your listening comprehension of native speakers improves. As you say, if we have learned English mainly by reading and writing, we are likely to have many pronunciation mistakes and difficulty understanding native speakers. If this is your case, I highly recommend that you do the exercises and the tests in the 15 Pronunciation Modules several times.
  21. 3 points
    Minoo

    How to build vocabulary ?

    Thank you for starting this interesting chat topic. Here is what I think: If you want to be able to actively use the vocabulary that you learn in your own writing and speaking, you must learn it in context and as part of a phrase, not in isolation or through translation. The best way to access vocabulary like this is by reading and listening. The choice of what you read and listen to depends entirely on what type of vocabulary you need in your daily life and your interests. Thanks to the Internet, you now have access to written and spoken English on any topic under the sun. One thing we must never forget if we have learned new words through reading is to check their pronunciation in an online dictionary. Never guess how a word in English is pronounced! I'd love to read everyone's opinion, experience and suggestions on how to expand one's vocabulary range.
  22. 3 points
    Minoo

    How to use this forum & Example

    The correct spelling is '1990s'. There's no need for an apostrophe as this is a plural 's'.
  23. 2 points
    Minoo

    Adjectives and adverbs

    Hello Hari, Assuming your question is about expanding our repertoire of such words (and not how to use them grammatically correctly), I would recommend reading novels as a way of enlarging your repertoire. It is the descriptive texts in novels that will be full of adjectives and adverbs. However, I would suggest that you choose simplified graded novels where you will find common and frequently used adjectives and adverbs that you can use in your own speaking and writing. There are two good series you can choose novels from: - Macmillan Readers - Oxford Bookworms And remember, as I recommend for any type of vocabulary building exercise: 1. Write down a phrase or a sentence that contains the word you're learning, not (just) the translation. 2. Check and learn the pronunciation of the new word in an online dictionary or use the audio version of the same book to hear all of it including the new words.
  24. 2 points
    Minoo

    Possessive 's'

    Hello Leonardo, Thank you for your question. To clarify: 1. Yes, we use a possessive 's' for comments made by the colleagues because, in a sense, what is made by someone 'belongs' to them, e.g. Newton's laws. Here the apostrophe comes after the plural 's': ... colleagues' comments. 2. 'movie' is inanimate; therefore it would be better to say: the name of the movie. However, in modern English, this rule is not always followed, so you may also hear 'the movie's name'. I recommend you stick to the rule to be on the safe side.
  25. 2 points
    Minoo

    Grammar challenge 3

    Thank you everyone for participating in this challenge, which was slightly trickier than the previous two. The first point, as Butterfly55 has explained, is that 'anyone' is used with a singular verb. The trickier point is that if you need a pronoun or a possessive adjective to accompany 'anyone', 'everyone', etc., you should either use his/her & him/her, which is heavy, or use the 'genderless they'. So, the correct answer is: Has anyone brought their laptop with them? Well done if you got it right, but don't worry if you didn't. The purpose of the challenge is to make you aware of these tricky points.
  26. 2 points
    Minoo

    Happy New Year

    My best wishes for a great 2019 to you, Phil! I really appreciate your keen participation in the forums, particularly your very good answers to your peers' language questions. I'm looking forward to your continued valuable contributions this year.
  27. 2 points
    serg59

    Absence makes the heart grow fonder.

    Hello everyone, I just took my eye off the ball for a minute and was immediately defeated by monsieur Phil! My congratulations! Alrighty then. Be aware I'll be back.
  28. 2 points
    Minoo

    When the going gets tough ...

    Congratulations gentlemen! You have once again excelled yourselves and earned well-deserved credits. Thank you both for being such good sports.
  29. 2 points
    Minoo

    Pronunciation

    Thank you for answering Sasha, Phil. Indeed, you have recommended the best way to learn the pronunciation of 'pronunciation' Many people make the mistake of saying it the same way as the verb 'pronounce', not realising that the 'ou' (as in 'our') in the verb has changed to 'u' (as in 'fun') in the noun.
  30. 2 points
    Minoo

    Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.

    Spot on, Serge! Thanks for the great humour, Phil! You both deserve credits for your ongoing contribution.
  31. 2 points
    Minoo

    Pick up the pieces

    It is indeed! Well done, Phil.
  32. 2 points
    PHIL73

    Well I never!

    Hello Sergey, (also known as "Serg59" or "The Old Man and the Boat"), It's weird, but I don't remember that promise of a hundred dollars As to the credits, why would you need them? You have reached the Fluent Rank already, close to the Sun (So, you have nothing to do of course ) Now I must leave you and go to work on my English because I'm far from fluency (I must confess that, from time to time, I need to "Googlize" your sentences to understand them ...)
  33. 2 points
    Minoo

    Well I never!

    Hello Phil and Sergey, Although Phil's is the expression I was looking for, I do like Sergey's as well, so you both earn credits. Thank you for being such good sports!
  34. 2 points
    serg59

    Well I never!

    You're pulling my leg. It's a wrong answer but I like it.
  35. 2 points
    PHIL73

    Well I never!

    Hello Minoo, I think it could be this expression: "You don't say!" Or that one which is often heard in films or in spoken English: "You're kidding." (You must be kidding)
  36. 2 points
    Minoo

    Confusion

    Thank you Phil for answering Mohammed. In case the confusion comes from the use of the word 'other', remember that after possessive pronouns, we use 'other' for both singular and plural possessions: another appointment >> my another other appointment other appointments >> my other appointments
  37. 2 points
    serg59

    It rings a bell!

    Let me see your passport.
  38. 2 points
    PHIL73

    Clothes make the man.

    Hello Minoo and Serg, First and foremost the easiest one: "Clothes don't make the man." (I told you, it was easy ) And then: "The man makes the suit." Probably the most famous one: "Don't judge a book by its cover." This must be an old one: "An ape's an ape, a varlet's a varlet, though they be clad in silk or scarlet." I also like your third and final one, Serg; We are like onions with different layers. "Know Thyself", like he said ...
  39. 2 points
    Minoo

    Rome wasn't built in a day.

    You got it in one. Well done, Phil.
  40. 2 points
    PHIL73

    Oh no! He (be) difficult again today.

    Hello 1karola, You use the Present Continuous with the verb to be when you talk about someone's behaviour at the moment. So in your example above, the sentence "He is difficult" would mean that he is always difficult generally speaking. But the answer: "Oh no! He is being difficult again today." means that he is difficult today , that's a temporary behavior. Maybe tomorrow he won't be that difficult (hopefully if he isn't a spoiled child ) I hope I've answered your question. The best
  41. 2 points
    PHIL73

    A little vs little

    Hello Karola, I don't know what lesson you're talking about, but I hope the following will help: When you say "a little", you mean a small amount. On the other hand, when you say "little" before a noun, it also means a small amount, but this time the amount is almost nothing, not enough. Examples: - "I have a little money" >> a small amount, but it's enough. - "I have little money" >> a small amount, but almost nothing, not enough to get what I want. So, your example sentence above means: "a small amount of coffee is good for your metabolism." Best regards
  42. 2 points
    Minoo

    You can't teach an old dog new tricks.

    Well done, Phil! You got it in one! And, you've got Sergey's stamp of approval too.
  43. 2 points
    PHIL73

    Time and tide wait for no man.

    Ha ha! I don't have any "ciphered archives" but I have a good friend, his name is Google Search, and he knows a lot about everything
  44. 2 points
    Chary

    Present perfect query.

    Thanks to Phil and Minoo for reply, it has answered my questions.
  45. 2 points
    PHIL73

    Actions speak louder than words.

    Hello Minoo, Yes indeed, I agree with that saying. You can tell lies with words but not with actions, which show who you really are. I think it's even better when words and actions match. Maybe politicians should apply this adage more often ...
  46. 2 points
    Minoo

    Grammar

    Hello Satratey and Phil, Satratey's sentence is correct except for missing an article: I got the pipeline welded by a / the welder. This is an example of the causative verb 'get', which I've covered in the latest exclusive video here. You may want to watch this for more information. Phil's sentence, as you have suspected it yourself, seems to be a word-for-word translation form French (faire faire quelque chose), which doesn't work in English.
  47. 2 points
    Samantha Dehghan

    Intuitive and structured teaching - highly recommended

    I highly recommend teaching sessions with Minoo. She is an excellent and patient teacher who combines a friendly and intuitive style of teaching with a structured and client-centred approach. I took one-to-one sessions with her to gain confidence as a non-native English speaker for presentations at conferences. She helped me with the rhythm of my sentences, stress and intonation. Since then, I have successfully delivered several presentations to an international audience.
  48. 2 points
    PHIL73

    Is Present Simple Tense can be used to indicate future ?

    Hello Mehboobleo, Yes indeed. The Present Simple is sometimes used to talk about the future when we talk about scheduled events, timetables, calendars, and so on. Exemples: "My train leaves at 08:00 pm"; "; "The restaurant opens at 07:30 tonight"; "The plane arrives at 06:00 pm tomorrow". Those verbs are often used with to refer to scheduled events: begin, start, finish, arrive, leave, end, ... I hope my answer helps you
  49. 2 points
    Minoo

    Which are good books to learn English Grammar ?

    I agree with Phil. Before I developed my own material, I used to use the book Phil has recommended here. It is a very good book. For those of you who prefer printed material, please remember that all the exercises for the 50 Grammar Modules (units) on the platform are downloadable. Each pdf download costs 1 credit and includes both the exercises and the answer key. Whether you choose to buy a grammar book or download my pdfs, if your objective is to be able to use the grammar correctly when you speak, I highly recommend that you get the audio recordings as well so you can listen to and repeat the sentences that you are reading and writing. If you don't practise these orally, no matter how good your knowledge of grammar is, you won't be able to use the structures reflexively when you speak. Obviously, if your objective is only to improve your writing, then the audio version of the material is not essential.
  50. 2 points
    Minoo

    How to use this forum & Example

    Welcome to the ‘Chat’ Forum. Here you can suggest a topic to chat about with your peers. It can be a topic related to language learning or a general topic. Examples: Language learning: I think the best way to increase our vocabulary range is by watching TV. Do you agree? General: Some people think it’s too late to stop climate change.’What do you think?
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