Jump to content
  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
sunny1

Questions

Question

sunny1

Hello,

In the Youtube video on questions, a distinction is drawn between cases where you can (subject verb inversion) and cannot see the auxiliary (does).

But "Prices will fall" is an exception, since there is only one verb in the future tense. Even so it is listed as having an auxiliary.

What about a simple example like "It is good." Again, even though there is only one verb, therefore no auxiliary, the question would involve subject verb inversion.

Please could you help me understand this classification?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post

4 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0
Minoo

Hello Sunny (not sure that's your actual name?)

The distinction is made between 'Can we see the auxiliary verb, i.e. the verb that I need to formulate a question, in the affirmative sentence or not. Compare:

Prices will fall.  (We can see 'will'.)
It is good. (We can see 'is'.)
He lives / lived here. (We cannot see 'does' or 'did'.)
They know it. (We cannot see 'do'.)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
  • 0
sunny1

So just to make sure, it is only the verb to be and modal verbs where there is inversion, and for all other verbs the do/does construction is used? Many thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
  • 0
Minoo

In Present & Past Perfect tenses, you can also see the auxiliary:

I have / had done ....

He has / had been doing ...

Share this post


Link to post
  • 0
sunny1

Thanks Minoo. And in those cases is there a clear rule?

Is there a difference between have as a main verb and have as an auxiliary?

Presumably inversion only where have is an auxiliary. E.g.:

Have you any wool?

Do you have any wool? (Probably most natural, right?)

Have you got any wool?

...I have found the answer in the lessons. Thanks!

Edited by sunny1
Found answer in lessons

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.